Inside the Issues

Issue 13 - F-14 Tomcat: Why move the wings?

Issue 13 - F-14 Tomcat: Why move the wings?

22 November 2011

David I Roberts explains a brief history of swept wing and variable geometry aircraft up to the TFX.

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Issue 12 - F4U Corsair: Contents

28 September 2011.

The mighty Corsair has to be one of the most instantly recognisable of Second World War fighter aircraft. Big, powerful, its gull wing design, high cockpit and large radial engine gave it a very distinctive look. The first prototype was delivered in 1940, and series production began in 1942. This was not to end until 1953 with 12,571 being built, the longest production run of any American fighter. The fighters saw active service during the Second World War, the Korean War, the First Indochina War, Algerian War, the Suez Crisis and finally in 1969 in the Football War between El Salvador and Honduras, certainly one of the longest combat records of any military aircraft. Although it achieved a kill ratio of 11 to 1 in US Marine Corps service, this very successful aircraft was initially rejected for service with the US Navy, its early development being dogged by setbacks. This issue of Aviation Classics tells the whole story of this remarkable machine, its designers and pilots.

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Issue 12 - F4U Corsair: Team Players - Editor's introduction

28 September 2011.

Well, the magazine is officially two years old with this issue, No. 12, the Chance Vought, or Vought, or Goodyear or Brewster,  F4U or FG-1 or F-3A, Corsair. Almost as many manufacturers and designations as the Harrier in the last issue, but also like that aircraft, one immortal name.

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Issue 12 - F4U Corsair: Carrier crash!

28 September 2011.

In another article supplied by David G Powers, Fred Blechman describes the day he made his last flight in an F4U-5 Corsair, although at the time he did not know that this was the case. The dangers of flying large powerful aircraft from small carriers are perfectly illustrated by this honest account.

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Issue 12 - F4U Corsair: The last of the line

28 September 2011.

The Corsair in French Navy service by David Oliver - The 12,571st and very last Corsair to leave the Chance Vought Dallas production line on January 31, 1953 was an F4U-7 for the French naval air arm, the Aéronavale.

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Issue 11 - Harrier: Contents

29 July 2011.

Aviation Classics takes a leap forward in time this month as we trace the history of one of the most remarkable aircraft of all time. Sir Sydney Camm’s design department at Hawker Siddeley began design work in 1957 on the world’s first vertical take-off and landing jet aircraft, and we tell the story from this time to the RAF’s retirement of the type in 2010. With never before published photographs from the Falklands War, Iraq and Afghanistan, Issue 11 is a unique tribute to the Harrier, its engineers and pilots.

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Issue 11 - Harrier: Aviation and politics: Do not mix - Editor's introduction

29 July 2011.

I find this page hard to write, espcially when I am angry. One day my best friend counselled me thus: “If you feel anger, write about it, it will give you perspective and calm the emotion.” Okay, it’s worth a try, thought I. That said, you are looking at the 24th draft of this introduction. See, I told you it was hard.

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Issue 11 - Harrier: The Harrier Abroad

28 July 2011.

Overseas customers for the Harrier were surprisingly few. Interestingly, all the foreign air arms to operate the Harrier bought their aircraft through the United States with two exceptions.

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Issue 11 - Harrier: The Trainers - The Harrier T.2 to T.12, and the TAV-8A and B

28 July 2011.

The unusual handling of the new VTOL aircraft and the unique skills required of its pilots led to the development of a range of two-seat trainer variants to assist in converting pilots to the Harrier. Prior to its introduction, a new pilot’s first solo flight was also his first flight!

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Issue 10 - de Havilland Mosquito: Contents

25 May 2011.

The ‘Wooden Wonder’ was without doubt one of the most versatile combat aircraft of the Second World War. In this issue we examine all of the variants of this much modified machine and place the reader in the cockpit. From anti-shipping strikes in the fjords of Norway to the jungle heat of the Far East, we tell the whole story of this elegant machine and the men who flew her.

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Current Issue: McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 A/B/C/D Hornet

Issue McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 A/B/C/D Hornet

The story of the multirole Naval fighter and the companies that created it

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